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Dartmoor images Fine Art prints of Dartmoor

Skull and jawbone on a windswept moorland. Dartmoor, Devon. Colin Munro Photography

 

As Christmas draws near, why not give a photographic art of local landscapesas a gift? My Dartmoor images are available as art prints and cards. These can be purchased dierct from me (see below). As a long term Devon resident, and keen supporter of Devon Wildlife Trust and its work, 10% of all purchases made before Christmas will be donated to the Devon Wildlife Trust. All images on my website are watermarked.  This will NOT appear on the print.

I’ve been taking a few Dartmoor images recently. The moor always looks more interesting as the weather turns colder and the days shorter. This has resulted in a few nights camping out. Sometimes chasing the elusive sunrise that remains hidden behind a thick blanket of grey cloud; sometimes up to mid-thigh in freezing fast-flowing rivers. So I’ve decided to pull a few together, some old, some new. I try and steer clear of well worn styles and try to capture the feel and atmosphere of the moor, the bleak, harsh beauty and the wide open spaces. As ever, all my images are available to purchase as fine art prints, each printed to order to specific requirements. If you’d like to know more then email me here.

Lichen covered granite boulders of a dry stone wall. Dartmoor Devon. Colin Munro Photography. Fine Art prints

Image 1346. Lichen covered granite boulders of a dry stone wall. Dartmoor Devon.

The glow from a lantern inside a dome tent on a starry, moonlit night on Dartmoor.  Colin Munro Photography.

Image 1002. The glow from a lantern inside a dome tent on a starry, moonlit night on Dartmoor

Icicles and ice formations around a fast flowing stream on the steep-sided Teign Valley, Dartmoor, Devon.  Available as a fine art print. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Image 1054. Icicles and ice formations around a fast flowing stream on the steep-sided Teign Valley, Dartmoor, Devon.

Boulders and small waterfalls on the East Dart River, high on Dartmoor above Two Bridges. Dartmoor National Park. Fine Art prints for sale. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Image 1019. Boulders and small waterfalls on the East Dart River, high on Dartmoor above Two Bridges. Dartmoor National Park

Icicles form along the lip of a rocky overhang on the steep sides of the River Teign Valley, East Dartmoor, Dartmoor National Park,  Devon, England.  Fine art prints available. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Image 1057. Icicles form along the lip of a rocky overhang on the steep sides of the River Teign Valley, East Dartmoor, Dartmoor National Park.

The East Dart River tumbles through a boulder strewn valley, East Dartmoor.  An HDR image.  This image is available as a fine art print to purchase. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Image 1348. The East Dart River tumbles through a boulder strewn valley, East Dartmoor.

Icicles over a moorland stream, Dartmoor National Park, Devon, England. colin Munro photography

Image 791. Icicles over a moorland stream, Dartmoor National Park, Devon.

Icicles above a small waterfall on the South Teign River, Dartmoor, Devon, England. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Image 41. Icicles above a small waterfall on the South Teign River, Dartmoor.

Wind dried bones picked clean by ravens and foxes.  Dartmoor National Park. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Image 1349. Wind dried bones picked clean by ravens and foxes. Dartmoor National Park.

The boulder-strewn steep sided valley of the East Dart River above Two Bridges, Dartmoor National Park, Devon. Colin Munro Photography

Image 1020. The boulder-strewn steep sided valley of the East Dart River above Two Bridges, Dartmoor National Park, Devon

Boulders and small waterfalls on the East Dart River, high on Dartmoor above Two Bridges.  Dartmoor National Park Colin Munro Photography

Image 1021. Boulders and small waterfalls on the East Dart River, high on Dartmoor above Two Bridges. Dartmoor National Park.Fine Art Prints.

FINE ART PRINTS All of the above images can be puchased as Fine Art, archive quality prints on high grade paper or canvas.

Prints up to 10×15 inches (25x38cm) size are produced on Fuji Crystal Archive DP Professional Paper using the latest Fuji Frontier Digital Wet Photographic processing. This system produces rich, vibrant colours and has an archival life of up to 35 years, making ideal for producing long lasting prints. They are available in Pearl or Gloss finish.

8×12 inches (20x30cm) prints are available for only £22 per print.
10×15 inches (25x38cm) prints are available for only £32 per print.

If you are interested in purchasing one or more prints please call or email me stating the finish (pearl or gloss) and the size required. Currently I am happy to accept PayPal, bank transfer, cheque or cash on collection. Cheques will need to clear before delivery.
Please add £2.50 for postage and packaging to mainland UK, worldwide postage on request.

Larger prints, up to 62 inches (1075cm) across are available.
These can be printed on photo gloss or pearl paper, fine art rag paper or on canvas.
Block mounts and backlit
Again the prints can be supplied in block mounts or as a print for backlighting. Please contact me for details and prices.

HOW TO BUY. If you are interested in any of the above options please email or call me, 07926 478 199, stating the Image Number (given in caption), image size, finish (pearl or gloss) and number of images and how you would like to pay.  I will then reply confirming the amount.

Paypal: To pay for prints by simply log in to paypal and make the payment to colin (at) colinmunrophotography.com.
Bank transfer: To pay by bank transfer simply let me know in your email and I will include the account details in my response.
Cheque: To pay by cheque, let me know and I will include the postal address in my reply. Please note that you will need to allow extra time for cheques to clear on delivery times.
Confirmation:Once I receive payment I will email you confirming this. Prints should then be despatched within five working days.

More prints

You can search my blog for prints for sale by typing ‘Prints for sale’ in the seach box at the top, or simply by clicking this link.

Email me or telephone +44 (0)7926478199 for prices and delivery details.

More... See more of my Devon images fine art prints here

The wreck of an old wooden boat trapped in ice covered mudflats is silhouetted against an ominous sky. Exe Estuary near Turf Locks, Devon, UK. Fine Art Prints for sale. Colin Munro Photography. www.colinmunrophotography.com

Old wooden boat trapped in ice covered mudflats

More of my Dartmoor images are available on Photoshelter, where prints can be bought or images licensed click here
A selection of my images are available on Redbubble (Australia) as prints, posters and cards here

Sunrise over Cockwood Harbour at low tide, Exe Estuary, Devon.

Dawn over Cockwood Harbour on a frosty December morning.

Courses, Classes and Workshops. If you like my Dartmoor images you may be interested in my one day landscape photography courses for individuals and small groups autumn/winter 2012. These will be based around the Exe and Teign Estuaries and East Dartmoor. More info here.

Enfield Bullet 500cc at sunset. Prints for sale, Colin Munro Photography.

Enfield Bullet 500cc at sunset.

Photoshop is an essential part of my toolkit for successful landscape photographs, in the same way we used to dodge and burn prints when working with film.  If you would like to learn more about the potential of Photoshop to enhance your images why not sign up for one of my one to one (or small group) Photoshop sessions.  These are economical and targetted at exactly what you want to learn.  More info here.

Moorland streams on Christmas Day – how to do things the hard way.

Moorland streams on Christmas Day – how to do things the hard way.
A small stream Dunsford Wood, Teign Valley, Devon, England.  This is a long exposure images taken to produce a fluid, surreal look to the flowing river. Colin Munro Photography

A small stream Dunsford Wood, Teign Valley, Devon, England.

Like all photographers I am sometimes asked how I created certain images, and how difficult getting certain pictures were. The answer in most cases is ‘not that difficult provided you’ve planned it and are well prepared’. But sometimes I just make things difficult for myself.

The above picture is a long exposure, 30 seconds in this case, used to blur movement (in the above picture the flowing water) producing a milky, fluid and slightly surreal look to the flowing stream. Obviously the amount of light hitting the camera sensor has to be limited to compensate for such a long exposure. Stopping down to a very small aperture helps but will only get you so far, rarely all the way to 30 seconds exposure. Stacking neutral density filters in front of the lens is one way, but a simpler way (especially this time of year when days are short) is to shoot at dusk, when light levels are naturally low and long shutter speeds are not merely desirable but also necessary.

Late Christmas Day I made a snap decision to get out on to Dartmoor, go for a walk and get some nice images. I left in a rush, trying to multi-task ineffectively as usual. The moor was not inspiring – low grey cloud and steady drizzle do not make for great pictures, so I turned around and reluctantly headed home. Light was fading fast when I found this little stream in the steep, wooded valley of the River Teign. I pulled over and decided to try and get some shots. This was where my rushing and lack of preparation came home to roost. I realised I had left my walking boots by the entrance to my boat and had only the city shoes I was wearing with me. Worse still, upon opening my tripod case (not checked before I left) I discovered that somehow the tripod head had snapped in two (I’ll be writing to Manfrotto shortly). Luckily I also had a small, six inch, tabletop tripod with me, but that meant actually getting in to the stream and perching it on top of boulders if I were obtain any useable shots. By the time I found a suitable spot along the stream it was about 4:15pm and getting gloomier by the minute. A quick scan around confirmed that there were no suitable boulders at the edge of the stream on which to mount the tripod; there was no alternative, shoes and socks had to come off and I had to wade out in to the middle of the stream. Thirty minutes later I stumbled to the side. The light had well and truly gone, so it was time to pack up. I had by then also lost all feeling below the ankles. It was not until i started driving home again that feeling began to return to my feet, doing so in painful waves as flow returned to constricted blood vessels. I had ample time to reflect on the stupidity of my lack of planning. My first actions the following day were to buy a spare tripod and place wellingtons and thick socks on the boot of my car in readiness. Hopefully that is at least one mistake I won’t repeat. Meanwhile I have now place some of these images in my art images of Devon Landscapes Gallery. This can be viewed (and prints purchased) here. Hopefully it was worth the effort. Colin

Start Point and Start Bay, South Devon

Rocky headland, Start Point, South Devon, England. Image MBI000921.
Rock Ridge and sky, Start Point, Rock Ridge and sky, Start Point, South Devon, England. Image No. MBI000920. Colin Munro Photography

South Devon, England. Image No. MBI000920.

 

Rocky headland, Start Point, South Devon, England. Image MBI000921.

Rocky headland, Start Point, South Devon, England. Image MBI000921.

 A very blustery day in late June saw see scrambling around the rocks on Start Point with my son.  The southwesterly wind was whipping white horses off the wave tops on the western side of the headland; to the east, sheltered by the high rocks of Start Point, the water within Start bay was almost mirror smooth, disturbed only by surface ripples.

Start Bay from Start Point,  South Devon, England. Image No. MBI000922.

Start Bay from Start Point, South Devon, England. Image No. MBI000922.

 

As ever, these images are available to reproduce as rights managed images or as art prints on a variety of media.  If you’d like to use any of the images in a publication, display, website etc., please email be (colin ‘at’ colinmunrophotography.com) noting the image number and where you’d like to use the image.  If you are interested in a print, please visit the prints page for options then email me. Thanks, Colin Munro.

Kitesurfer and dramatic sky, Exmouth beach, Devon, England

Kitesurfer and dramatic sky, Exmouth beach, Devon, England
Kite surfer against a dramatic sky, surfing the Exe Estuary between Pole Sand sandbar and Exmouth Beach, Exmouth, Devon, England. Image MBI000660.

Kite surfer against a dramatic sky, surfing the Exe Estuary between Pole Sand sandbar and Exmouth Beach, Exmouth, Devon, England. Image MBI000660.

Kitesurfer and dramatic sky, exmouth beach, Exmouth, Devon, England. Image MBI000660. Please email me, quoting this number if you’d like to license use of this image or purchase a fine art print.
Kitesurfers catch the wind, flying along between Pole sand sandbar and Exmouth beach on a blustery summer evening.  Kitesurfing has become hugely popular in the Exe Estuary off Exmouth in recent years; on some evenings I have counted upwards of twenty kites. 

The Port Royal Pub, Exeter historic quay, at night.

The Port Royal Pub, Exeter historic quay, at night.
The Port Royal bar reflected on the River Exe at night. Exeter historic quay, Exeter, Devon, England. Image MBI000910.

The Port Royal bar reflected on the River Exe at night. Exeter historic quay, Exeter, Devon, England. Image MBI000910.

 The Port Royal bar reflected on the River Exe at night. Exeter historic quay, Exeter, Devon, England. image No. MBI000910. Please email me, quoting this number if you’d like to license use of this image or purchase a fine art print.

I took this pic a couple of nights ago. The last of the revellers had staggered home and the quayside was quiet.  It was warm and perfectly still, with a clear starry sky overhead.  Perfect for this type of image. So a little after midnight I pulled my gear together and climbed out of my boat’s saloon.  For a pic such as this, relying solely on distance sodium street lighting and faint starlight the iso needs to be cranked up a bit, but not so much as to make the image very noisy, and, obviously, the shutter speed way down.  Depth of field is not an issue as everything in the picture is distant, so the iris can be (and was) wide open.  I used an old 20mm prime lens, a favourite of mine.  The sodium lighting gives the pub and adjacent buildings an unearthly yellow hue.  I rather like  it this so did not atempt to change this, feeling it added to the rather surreal look.  Clearly the stars and buildings differ massively in brightness. To acheive useable exposure of both required melding two images at very different shutter speeds (four stops difference if memory serves me).  Some post processing of the starry sky was also required. The image was converted in to a grey scale image to remove colour noise, then reconverted back to an RGB image before melding.

Teign Valley: Dunsford Wood and the River Teign, Christmas Day

Teign Valley: Dunsford Wood and the River Teign, Christmas Day

Steps Bridge, River Teign, Dunsford Wood, in mid-winter

Steps Bridge, River Teign, Dunsford Wood, in mid-winter


This has turned out to be one of the coldest Christmas days on record here in South Devon. Living on a boat, this has not escaped my attention. I haven’t been moving too far from the woodburner stove at night. For the second winter in a row I’ve been locked in ice for weeks on end. Around 2a.m. this morning I was woken by a loud bang and the whole boat shuddering strongly. It was around minus 10 Centigrade (~14deg F) and Maria had shifted as the ice thickened and expanded. Maria weighs around 30 tons. I climbed on to deck to check the thickness of the ice. A few hard thumps with an old wooden oar succeeded only in sending gunshot-like sounds ricocheting through the night and splintering the blade of the oar. I gave up and retired to bed. Maria is very stoutly built with oak frames at 11″ spacing, she wasn’t about to be crushed. I just don’t want the ice to get any thicker.
River Teign partially frozen, Dunsford Wood, South Devon, UK.

River Teign partially frozen, Dunsford Wood, South Devon, UK.

Christmas day was perfect: clear blue skies and crisp white snow underfoot. So after doing the family stuff in the morning I decided to take my son Calum walking in the Teign Valley through Dunsford Wood. It would certainly give us an appetite for Christmas dinner. Dunsford Wood is owned by the National Trust and Managed by the Devon Wildlife Trust, with footpaths through the woodland and along the riverbank open to the public. In summer it is a great place to see huge wood ant colonies and the rare High Brown Fritillary butterfly. Year round it’s a great place to walk; light open oak, hazel and ash woodland on one side and on the other the river lazily gliding past (or thundering past, depending on season). As it happened, the river was doing neither along much of the walk on Christmas Day; or if it was drifting past it was doing so beneath a carapace of ice. We were lucky enough spot a couple of dippers (Cinclus cinclus) as we walked ( a first for my son). We watched one for several minutes as it skipped between sheets of ice-covered river, occasionally slipping beneath the surface where it found ice-free water. Unfortunately the sun was already low and the only long lens I had with me was way too slow, so I didn’t bother getting it out. As the sun set and the temperature plumetted we headed back to the landrover hoping that the stove would still be going when we got back to the boat.

River Teign partially frozen, Dunsford Wood, South Devon, UK.

River Teign partially frozen, Dunsford Wood, South Devon, UK.

Snow-covered upland oak woodland along banks of the River Teign,  Dunsford Wood, South Devon, UK.

Snow-covered upland oak woodland along banks of the River Teign, Dunsford Wood, South Devon, UK.


As always my images are available to license and as fine art prints. If you’d like to use one of my images for publication please contact me. If you’d like a print of one of the images drop me an email stating image number and print size (costs for prints can be found on my fine art prints pages, e.g. Fine Art prints of Devon. Email me.
To my main website www.colinmunrophotography.com

The swans of Exeter

The swans of Exeter
Mute swans (Cygnus olor) congregate under Cricklepit Bridge

Mute swans (Cygnus olor) congregate under Cricklepit Bridge

One of the advantages of living on a boat is that you get to see a lot of aquatic life go past. Exeter is famous for its mute swans (Cygnus olor) with congregate in large numbers on both the River Exe and the Exeter Ship Canal. The swans have become very used to the tourists and locals strolling along the river and canal side in the centre of town, so much so they even nest next to the footpath in the heart of town. At this time of year pairs of swans can be seen cruising around guarding clutches of fluffy grey signets. The adults will shepherd the signets along, occasionally pulling bits of weed off the botton for the youngstesr to feed on, or paddling furiously with their webbed feet to stir up weed in the shallows for them.

Mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor) only a few days or weeks old.

Mute swan cygnet (Cygnus olor) only a few days or weeks old.

Mute swan cygnets (Cygnus olor) feeding in shallows.

Mute swan cygnets (Cygnus olor) feeding in shallows.

Mute swan cygnets (Cygnus olor) swimming.

Mute swan cygnets (Cygnus olor) swimming.

A pair of mute swan (Cygnus olor) cygnets swimming, Exeter Ship Canal.

A pair of mute swan (Cygnus olor) cygnets swimming, Exeter Ship Canal.

As always my images are available to license and as fine art prints. If you’d like to use one of my images for publication please contact me. If you’d like a print of one of the images drop me an email stating image number and print size (costs for prints can be found on my fine art prints pages, e.g. Fine Art prints of Devon. Email me.
To my main website www.colinmunrophotography.com

Exeter historic quayside at night

Exeter historic quayside at night

Exeter historic quayside at night. Cafe live on a warm summer night, Exeter, Devon.

Exeter historic quayside at night. Cafe live on a warm summer night, Exeter, Devon.


Feels like summer has finally arrived. We’ve had a few great days recently, and for once it’s co-incided with schools half-term so I’ve had the chance to take get the boogie board out with my son, rather than watching DVDs as rain lashes the windows (the norm for holidays!). I’ve been playing around with High Dynamic Range images a little bit recently. I’m not always keen on the effect, sometimes it works for me sometimes its just too lurid.

There has been a quay in Exeter since Roman times; the main trade was wool and woolen cloth, with the Customs House being built in 1680 to collect taxes on this burgeoning trade. The square riggers and the trade has long gone but many of the fine old buildings remain, converted now to cafes, bars and craft shops. I took these two images while out bat watching along the river bank with my kid (an extra treat as way past his normal bed-time). Each image is a composit of three long exposure images (these varied from 1/8th to around a second, from memeory). I actually took around 10 images of each scene but selected only three for the final images.

Exeter quayside at night. Cafe life along the river Exe by Exeter's historic quay in central Exeter, Devon, on a warm summer evening.

Exeter quayside at night. Cafe life along the river Exe by Exeter's historic quay in central Exeter, Devon, on a warm summer evening.


Larger images (and additional images of Exeter) can be viewed by clicking on this link here. If there is sufficient interest I may produce some prints of these images for sale.

Ice cold in Alex ….or Exeter

Ice cold in Alex ….or Exeter
Boats locked in ice at midnight, Exeter Canal Basin, Exeter city, Devon, England.

Boats locked in ice at midnight, Exeter Canal Basin, Exeter city, Devon, England.

Apologies to John Mills and co for the bad pun. By chance this next blog was going to be about Alexandria, Egypt (well, Abu Qir actually, a small seaport nearby). Things came up and I haven’t quite completed it yet. As temperatures plummet and my boat is once again locked in ice I somehow managed to prise myself away from my woodburner last night to play around with some long exposures and high dynamic range shots. Returning to the warmth of the saloon around midnight, after a couple of hours freezing my butt off, I decided I had suffered exposure long enough and a warming whisky was required. Feeling began to return to my fingertips and I felt reassured they weren’t frostbitten after all.

Reviewing the pics afterwards I felt reasonably satisfied my time wasn’t entirely wasted. The one I’ve attached is an HDR composite of three exposures, ranging from 30 seconds to around 10 seconds. In the end I decided to combine them manually rather than use software such as Photomatrix, layering alternative exposures and combining as looking pleasing to the eye (well to mine eye anyway).

I’ll upload more images as i get around to editing them. Expect a blog about Abu Qir soon too (possibly titled ‘Soaking wet in Alex’)

Boats and wind and winter skies

Boats and wind and winter skies

We’ve just had around ten days of stormy weather here in southwest UK; a series of deep lows have driven rain-laden westerlies out of the Atlantic and up the English Channel. I’ve spent this time trying to effect repairs on my deck between squalls, while winds howl through the rigging. Trying to pour molten pitch into leaky seams between planks, each seam rather less than quarter of an inch wide, in a force eight gale is somewhat akin to attempting to juggle ping-pong balls whilst standing in the downdraft of a helicopter. A stream of bubbling pitch carefully aimed at a newly raked out seam will unexpectedly slew sideways to decorate my newly sealed deck with a long string of tarry sine waves. I spend the next ten minutes scraping off rapidly solidifying pitch, then retire to my laptop as the next squall arrives. Days like this can make me long for the blue skies of summer. When trying to work outdoors on the water, winter offers relatively few advantages. It does offer others though. Whilst sun-kissed beaches and clear blue skies look pretty, I generally prefer my landscapes to look dramatic. Dark skies and storm clouds with shafts of sunlight breaking though are, to me, intrinsically more interesting. Very often the look of a landscape will change dramatically in seconds as cloud cover waltzes light and shade across the terrain. It’s the opportunity to capture these ephemeral patterns that makes me climb out of bed early on winter mornings, pile camera gear into the cab of my old Landrover and try to make it to my selected vantage point in time for sunrise. Okay, sometimes it does; and sometimes I’ll hit the ‘snooze’ button on my alarm, turn over and reassure myself there’ll be other mornings like this.

Landscape photography is one of the few areas where I still on occasion use film. In terms of workflow and cleanness of image 35mm film no longer compares with current DSLRs (to be brutal, spatial resolution, signal to noise ratio and even the old weakness of dynamic range are all better on good DSLRs than 35mm film equivalents), but there is something about producing images by initiating and influencing a chemical reaction on a medium you can touch and feel that has a magical quality about it. I no longer process my own film; cutting, mounting and scanning slides is enough of a chore. Yet exposing images on film still feels closer to the spirit of Louise and Auguste Lumiere’s autochromes or Hurley’s Paget Plates than allowing photons to kick electrons up the energy escalator in layers of silicon.

Given the wintry weather we (in the UK) are experiencing at the moment, I thought a local winter scene would be an appropriate image of the week. This one was taken a couple of years ago, on a chilly November afternoon on the Exeter canal near where it joins the Exe Estuary. The sun was getting fairly low and boat hulls were shining brightly against the dark water. It was very still, and where the canal widened to allow vessels to moor alongside, just in front of the first lock (the Turf Lock) a perfect mirror image of the moored boats reflected of the water. It may have rained later that day but I’m really not sure. It’s the moment I remember.
Link to image of the weekRead More