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Art Prints, Wall Art bought direct from my website

I am always increasing the number of my images that you can buy, direct from my website, as wall art for home or office. So I thought it might be useful to break down the steps, from selecting and image all the way to getting the final print delivered. So the first thing is to head to https://www.colinmunroimages.com

Colin Munro Images home page will look something like this (the main image will change). Click Buy Art Prints

Photo Labs.

Currently I use professional photolab Bay Photo Lab, in Santa Cruz, California, USA, as my primary print producer. I consider them one of the best print labs in the US, with a long history of supplying exceptional quality prints and an excellent service to professional photographers. If you use the automated ssyetm on my Colin Munro Images website (detailed below) the prints will be made and delivered by Bay Photos. They are also part of the Monterey Bay Area Green Business Programme, and actively working to minimise their environmental footprint. They will also ship internationally. If you are outside the US the shipping will be calculated on my website (see example below).

UK, Europe and Asia.

I also use excellent printers in London, UK, and Bangkok, Thailand. If you are in Europe or Asia, please email me with the photo code, the print style and the size, and I will arrange for it to be delivered from either London or Bangkok. If you are elsewhere in the World, and would really like a print, drop me an email and we’ll see what I can work out.

A screen shot of my Art Prints for Sale web page on www.colinmunroimages.com website

Clicking on the Buy Photos button will take you to the next screen, where you will have the option to chose between Wall Art and Digital Downloads.

After pressing the Buy Photos button, this is the next screen you will see.

So, let’s assume you are looking for a photography to have on your wall, maybe a framed canvas print or acrylic on metal or an aluminium print.

Selecting the Wall Art menu will up a scrolling side bar with a number of choices: Traditional Canvas, Stretched Canvas, Flat Canvas, Acrylic on Metal and Metal Prints, with more info available on each (and I know, different picture, I decided to vary it).

So let’s say you chose Acrylic Metal. The sidebar will change to a menu of sizes and prices. As you scroll up and down you will see also that the highlighted area of the image will change as the aspect ratio of the size selected changes.

Once the media is selected you then have a choice of sizes (and aspect ratios). The image will crop, depending on the aspect ratio chosen. You can see this varying dynamically as you hover over each different size.

And the process is pretty much the same which ever media you select.

The process of size and aspect ratio slection is the more or less the same which ever media you select. Illustrated here is Stretched Canavas, with a different image (a pair of seals, in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland).

At the next screen you will be able to change the selected area of the image to be made into the final print. The white border can be cropped in or moved out, or re-positioned (depending on the aspect ration chosen).

At this next screen you can change the crop to be printed, or reposition, by dragging the white border. You also have the choice to order more than one print.

You will then proceed to the checkout process, where you also have the option to chose the currency.

The Art Prints Checkout, where you can enter Shipping Info and chose your currency.

The next screen allows you to submit your billing information. You can chose to pay with most major credit cards, or with PayPal.

Hopefully that’s fairly straightforward. Don;t forget, you can always email me with queries about prints if I haven’t answered your question here.

Not quite Phileas Fogg

The katuali or flat-tail sea snake (Laticauda schistorhynchus) is a type of sea snake, or more precisely a krait, found only around Nuie Island in the South Pacific. There is some debate as to whether it is a seperate species or a sub-species of the black-banded sea krait (Laticauda semifasciata) also known as the Chinese sea snake. Colin Munro Photography www.colinmunroimages.com

I have been very lucky recently.  In the past 12 months alone my work has taken me to around 23 countries. Whilst not quite in the slipstream of Phileas Fogg it has nonetheless been something of a wild roller-coaster ride.  This has enabled me to greatly increase the range of my stock images, from orang utans to komodo dragons and Pitcairn Island to St Kilda.  The down side (I know, I know…. I’m not complaining) is that time to sort, edit, key-word and upload this exponentially growing back catalogue has been in short supply.

American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) lying on a muddy river bank, Tempisque River, Costa Rica. www.colinmunroimages.com

American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) lying on a muddy river bank, Tempisque River, Costa Rica.

Often this has been limited to brief spells in cafes or airport departure lounges with sluggish WiFi.  However, the up side of a recent accident and a few weeks enforced recuperation in one country has been  time to sit down and tackle the rather daunting task of sorting through almost a terabyte or raw images.

The katuali or flat-tail sea snake (Laticauda schistorhynchus) is a type of sea snake, or more precisely a krait, found only around Nuie Island in the South Pacific.  There is some debate as to whether it is a seperate species or a sub-species of the black-banded sea krait (Laticauda semifasciata) also known as the Chinese sea snake. Colin Munro Photography www.colinmunroimages.com

The katuali or flat-tail sea snake (Laticauda schistorhynchus) is a type of sea snake, or more precisely a krait, found only around Nuie Island in the South Pacific.

I am now doggedly sifting through these and uploading to my stoc images website www.colinmunroimages.com.  This is a seachable site, where named galleries can be browsed (e.g. Norway, Cape Verde islands, Fish, Seabirds) or images can be searched by keyword, geographical area and other parameters.  The opening page links to a small number of showcase galleries which I will rotate as I update galleries.

Grey-headed kingfisher(Halcyon leucocephala) Cape Verde Islands, West Africa. Colin Munro Photography www.colinmunroimages.com

Grey-headed kingfisher(Halcyon leucocephala) Cape Verde Islands, West Africa

So if you haven’t checked out www.colinmunroimages.com yet why not give it a few minutes during your next coffee break.  If you have, then come back again next week and hopefully there will be updates since last time.  Either way, if you have any comments or requests then please get in touch colin@colinmunrophotography.com.

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Blue sharks, graceful sea wolves

Blue shark, Prionace glauca. A female blue shark swimming close to the surface off Southwest Cornwall, UK.

The blue shark, Prionace glauca, is possibly the most beautiful of sharks.  It is a slender, fast and graceful shark, but it is the vivid, almost electric blue colouration that is most striking.

Blue shark, Prionace glauca. A female blue shark swimming close to the surface off Southwest Cornwall, UK.

A blue shark passes close by.

Blues are oceanic sharks, uncommon in shallow coastal waters.  In the tropics they are normally found in deeper, cooler waters, but in temperate seas they are more likely to be found in surface waters (thus are described as being epipelagic).  This does not mean that in temperate waters they occur only in the warmer surface layers.  Recent data from satellite tags have shown that they blues may regularly undertake dives to more than 1000 metres.  One male blue shark, nicknamed Bodi by the researchers, was logged as having dived to 1250 metres off the Bay of Plenty (New Zealand) three weeks after being tagged in 2013.  An earlier joint British- Portuguese study recorded a female blue shark diving to 1160 metres off the coast of Portugal (Queiroz et al, 2012).   This behaviour is probably linked to hunting activity.  Blue sharks are quite catholic in their diet, eating a wide range of mid-water fish and cephalopods,  but appear to be particularly fond of squid, and of course squid will often undertake marked vertical migrations, with many species occurring at considerable depth.  That this deep diving behaviour of blues is primarily foraging for food is supported by a preponderance of deep water quid species found in the gut of contents of blue sharks caught by long-lines, in particular the wonderfully named vampire squid, Vampyroteuthis infernalis, a small deep-water squid those scientific name literally translates as the vampire squid from hell.

In the northern Atlantic at least, they appear to undertake seasonal migrations. They are unusual amongst ocean sharks in that they will sometimes aggregate in groups, often all same sex, as they roam.  This pack-like activity has lead to them being dubbed the wolves of the sea.  Around Southwest Britain blue sharks start to appear in June each year, and hang around until late October or early November.  Although there have been attacks on humans by blue sharks, aggressive behaviour is relatively rare.  Certainly in British waters, where large blues are rarely seen, most are quite timid and easy to scare off accidentally.  The largest blue caught in UK waters was approximately 2.5 metres long and weighed 107kg. This was caught off Penzance, Cornwall, in 2012 (but was also released).  Blues can grow up to 3.5 metres or more (the largest on record was 3.83 metres long) the females being significantly larger than males.

Blue shark, Prionace glauca. A female blue shark swimming close to the surface off Southwest Cornwall, UK.

Blue shark, Prionace glauca. A female blue shark swimming close to the surface off Southwest Cornwall, UK.

An underwater encounter with a blue shark is a wonderful experience, and provided one takes sensible precautions (i.e. wearing gloves, not wearing shiny bits of equipment and NOT trying to feed them) is normally quite safe.  Blue sharks have been one the shark species hardest hit by the practice of shark fining in various parts of the World and there numbers appear to have declined markedly.  Consequently it’s worth remembering that most blue sharks have far more cause to fear us that vice versa.

The above, and more of my blue shark images, can be found on my stock image website www.colinmunroimages.com. They can be licensed for publication, or purchased as fine art prints and canvas wall art.

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References cited: Queiroz N, Humphries NE, Noble LR, Santos AM, Sims DW (2012) Spatial Dynamics and Expanded Vertical Niche of Blue Sharks in Oceanographic Fronts Reveal Habitat Targets for Conservation. PLoS ONE 7(2): e32374. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0032374